Why you should use a log splitter

Flickering flames, sizzling sparks and a comforting crackle, there is no denying the magic of a fire. But for many, it’s a magic that is very hard work. Chopping and splitting logs by hand can be a very tough task, but a log splitter can change all that, meaning a comforting fire is wonderful again. Find out how…


Cold snaps can appear out of nowhere, so for those reliant on fire for heat, it’s handy to have a stack of logs ready for action. But preparing your wood by hand can take ages.

With log splitters, preparation time is chopped down dramatically, so that comforting fire can be ready and roaring in no time at all. Powerful dual log splitters can get through up to 150 logs in an hour, which is over two a minute. Something that these guys would be envious of.

Neat and Tidy

Messy log splinters
You’re going to need a bigger bucket
Source: Fimby
Chopping wood with an axe might make you feel powerful, but using an axe creates mess that will need tidying. So if picking up splinters isn’t your idea of a good time, use a log splitter which forces the wood to split cleanly, meaning less mess for you.

Not all of us are blessed with acres of space, so chopping wood by hand isn’t always a viable option. As well as being tidier, a log splitter also provides a compact solution to preparing wood – it doesn’t even require the space to swing an axe!


First aid kit outdoors
You might have sun block, but you don’t have axe cream
Source: Peak Mountaineering
Splitting wood by hand will help you build core strength, namely your lats, abs and gluteus maximus – otherwise known as your bottom! But for some, using an axe or maul will just compound old injuries, or create new ones. So negate this risk by removing the physical labour aspect. You just have to load the logs.

Forget pulling a muscle though, one missed stroke of an axe could result in serious injury! A log splitter offers much more protection as there are no swinging sharp edges. And to make it extra safe most log splitters have a safety cut out, eliminating the risk of electrocution.

Better fire

The only thing that makes fire better is wine
Source: Flickr
Fire needs three things to flourish: heat, oxygen and fuel. The easiest way to improve the amount of fuel you have, is by using wood with a larger surface area, allowing more access to burnable materials.

If a log goes in whole it won’t burn as well, and knotted or moist “green wood” is hard to split, so may have to go on in one piece.

But with hydraulic log splitters, or foot powered ones, most pieces of wood can be used, meaning a larger surface area, and a better fire.

A fire is no good if you can’t enjoy it. Log splitters also cut down preparation time so you can sit back and listen to the crackle and snap of burning logs.


A_deciduous_beech_forest_in_Slovenia for forestry
Grow your own wood
Source: Wikipedia
Green wood may be harder to chop, but finding green fuel for heating is even harder. If you’re lucky enough to have your own source of wood, or have a local sustainable source, then your fire can be a little bit greener.

Many buy firewood, pre-split and ready to go, however this is costly and you don’t always know the true source. By splitting local, sustainable and traceable wood at home, you know exactly what you are burning, and saving money in the long run too.

A log splitter may not be magical, but a fire is. So get the magic quickly, without the risk of pain, and without having to clean up lots of bits. The benefits are plentiful, and even go as far as improving your love life.

Give me a break – the length of men’s trousers

Michael Jackson was famous for wearing trousers that showed his socks. You might think the half masted look is a little odd, but for the moon-walking superstar, peculiar was normal.

But how should mens trousers be worn? Full break, half break or no break at all? Let’s find out.

What are breaks?

Primer trouser breaks
Because life is hard, and sometimes trousers need a break
Source: Primer Magazine
The break is where the bottom of your trouser meets your shoe, creating a fold in the cloth. A quarter break, or a half break is where there is less of a fold, but still a noticeable kink.

Longer trousers mean more than one fold or break. Go too long and your trousers will look like they don’t fit.

When there is no break, the bottom of the trouser sits perfectly at the top of the shoe around the ankle.

Suit trousers

medium Break
Suiting simplicity
Source: Effortless Gent
If it’s time for that business meeting, then you need to make sure your suit trousers touch the top of your shoes. A full break is fine, but a half or quarter break looks better.

To make sure they are the right length, look at the back of the shoe. This will take some flexibility, a mirror, or a friend. The leg of the trouser should stop just over half way down the back of the shoe.

One man famous for his socks, hasn’t quite got his break options correct. Channel 4 news reader, Jon Snow has taken the ‘no break’ thing to new levels.

on Snow socks for help the heroes
Breaking the rules for Help the Heroes
Source: Brand Rapport


Chinos with one break
Anyone afraid of red trousers?
Chinos are a versatile classic, perfect for a stroll at the weekend, and similarly suitable for the boardroom

For formal occasions, chinos should be worn with no break. As they have a loose fit, a full break will ruin the line of the trousers and deter from the smartening effect of formal shoes.

When keeping things casual with standard fit chinos, a full break will help exude relaxed vibes. To really show the shape of slim fitting chinos, wear with no break at all.


Light Stonewash Thermal Jeans
I bet you can’t tell they are thermal jeans?
Most of us wear jeans for casual occasions, whether traditional denim, the alternative of moleskin, or lightweight cotton options. But though there are several different fabric to choose from, it’s important to get the break correct.

With no break your socks are always on show, so make sure they aren’t embarrassing ones. The safer option is to go for a half break – suitably casual, without looking too long.

When jeans are too long, with more than one break, you run the risk of soggy, frayed, disheveled hems.


Green cords with a break
Booting in the cords
Cords are hardwearing and come in an abundance of colours, but it’s important to know how to wear them.

Mens cord trousers are often worn as part of a casual country outfit. A full break is too casual for the heritage look. A simple half break will sit perfectly with a pair of comfy winter boots and similarly well with country brogues.

Cords and brogues
Kicking it in the brogues
Source: Ask Andy About Clothes

Michael Jackson was able to get away without a break, but for the rest of us, there are rules to follow. First, learn the breaks and then learn which one you need for your trousers. Get this wrong and you will look a bit peculiar, but get it right, and you’ll be the most stylish gent around.

Celebs love them – so is it OK to wear slippers outside?

"Late Night With Jimmy Fallon">> at Rockefeller Center on July 20, 2011 in New York City.
Chatting about slippers?
Source: Nick Verreos
The majority of us might associate a pair of comfy slippers with a night on the sofa, feet up, watching the telly, but not so for the star studded showbiz elite.

These days, you’ll see Taylor Swift wear slippers on the red carpet. The irrepressible Ryan Gosling appeared on the US chat show, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, wearing – yes – carpet slippers.

So what’s going on? Are outdoor slippers cool? Or are the stars out of step? Here we find out.

The Albert slipper

velvet slippers
Slippers that hiss style
Source: The Funshion Mistress
Prince Albert’s eponymous slippers were a 19th century invention that had their origin in the majestic stately homes of the aristocracy. Lords of the manor sought footwear that didn’t damage their expensive floors but could cope with the outdoors. Enter the leather soled slipper.

Prince Albert refined the design with the addition of velvet and satin, and many added personalised embroidery.

These men’s slippers were the epitome of luxury and were worn at elaborate black tie dinners. In America, they became known as tuxedo slippers.

The Churchill slipper

Winston Churchill was not a man to be messed with, even in his pyjamas. A serial napper and a habitual wearer of slippers, he proved that casual slip-on footwear can be worn for nearly every occasion.

In the 1960s, velvet Albert slippers became popular with America’s elite, and RFK was no exception. Here he is with his children, on the steps of his family home – look at his feet – he’s wearing Albert slippers.

A man not scared by slippers
Source: Bull and Tassel
The most famous outdoor slipper wearer is rarely seen without his jim-jams. Rich, yes. Saintly, no. His behaviour may be questionable, but his sense of style is undoubtedly unique. Say hello to none other than Hugh Hefner.

Not all slipper wearers are saintly
Source: Flickr

Taking the bins out

Outdoor mule
Warming up for outdoors
It seems it’s acceptable for the elite to sport outdoor slippers inside and outside their homes, but what about us mere mortals?

Taking the bins out is a job few people enjoy. But some mens leather slippers are sturdy enough for the rigours of a pebbled path and won’t be worn down too quickly.

Slip-on mules made from nappa leather and with tough man-made soles, are much sturdier than traditional fabric slippers. With their smart looks, mules are perfect footwear for a quick natter over the fence with the neighbours, or a potter around the garden. And they’re equally at home – in the home.

The case against

tesco bans pyjamas
You should have bought some shoes
Source: My Moans
While there are some occasions where it’s fine to slip on your slippers, sometimes PJs and slippers are a definate no-no.

A Cardiff Tesco banned shoppers from wearing pyjamas and slippers to “avoid causing offence or embarrassment to others”. School headteachers in Middlesbrough evidently share the same view, writing to parents to ask them to not wear pyjamas when dropping off their kids.

Seen as lazy and a poor example to children, authorities from Louisiana to Shanghai have adopted anti PJ and slipper policies. Perhaps we’re seeing a return to more formal morning attire.

So are the celebs right? Is it OK to wear your slippers in public. We think the answer is yes – as long as you choose the right ones. For red carpet affairs, pick a pair of luxury Albert slippers, for taking out the bins, Churchill slippers or outdoor mules. For a trip to Tesco stick to loafers.

What potato peeler is the best?

The colder months are upon us which means a change in the menu. It’s out with the salads and in with stews, roasts and shepherd’s pie. But while the thought of winter stodge might get your stomach rumbling, peeling all those potatoes can prove time consuming.

So let’s see if we can make light work of scraping the spuds. Here’s our guide to peelers – which potato peeler is the best?


peeling potato with a knife
Watch those fingers
Source: My Home Cooking
The manly man’s choice for peeling spuds, and also the simplest. But with simplicity comes a lack of sophistication.

Unless the user is incredibly skilled, expect a lot of potato loss, and wasted time. If the user isn’t skilled, then get the first aid kit ready as a dull knife or a slip could result in injury.

Fixed handle blade

Spuds ready for the pot
Source: Canning Basics
Also known as the Lancashire peeler, this type of peeler, resembles a knife but is much safer because the sharp edge is hidden behind a guard. The French version, the ‘économe’, has two sharp edges, one that peels the skin, and one that’s angled to regulate depth.

Swiss designed swivel peelers have a fixed handle with a moveable blade. This enables the peeler blade to follow the surface of the vegetable or fruit.

Swivel and fixed blade peelers are great for carrots and parsnips, but for potatoes they can be time consuming as they don’t cover a huge area.

Y-shaped peeler

Y peeler portrait
Make haste with those spuds
Source: Journey Kitchen
Also known as a speed peeler and resembling a razor, the Y-shaped peeler variants make quick work of potato skin, and are very good for carrots and parsnips.

Most Y-shaped peelers have an ergonomic handle which is good news for stiff fingers. They also have a handy blade or loop on the edge for getting rid of unwanted potato eyes.

Speed peelers are safe and make quick work of potatoes and other veg. But if you have lots of spuds to peel, you may want to think bigger.

Electric potato peeler

Electric potato peeler
Super clean spuds
Why bother peeling by hand when a machine can do it for you? Throw the potatoes in the barrel, add a little water, and the rotating scourers will do the rest.

An electric potato peeler is great for those cooking large meals, and can often be found in professional kitchens.

The labour saving design of the automatic potato peeler, makes it the perfect choice for those with limited movement, a hungry horde to feed, or those who simply don’t have the time to peel by hand.

Mechanical peeler

mechanical peeler
Inspector Gadget’s potato peeler?
Source: Rain Coast Culture
Funky kitchen gadgets are becoming more and more popular, and the crank operated peeler is no exception.

The user turns the crank, and the fruit or vegetable, which is held in a vice, is pushed along a blade and the skin is peeled.

As they are designed primarily for apples, this type of peeler may not work so well on potatoes. But there is no doubting the funkiness of the device. Unfortunately it can only peel one spud at a time, and let’s face it, who wants to wait longer than necessary to tuck into that bowl of warming stew?

How dehumidifiers work

Fresh and airy atmospheres are a summer luxury. In winter, increased moisture and colder temperatures mean greater risk of health problems.

Dehumidifiers help fend off the mold, moisture and nasty molecules from damp air. How do they work their magic and what ones work best?

Crystal based dehumidifiers

Cordless and Reusable Compact Dehumidifier
It may be small but it packs a punch
Crystals in the device absorb moisture from the air, and then change colour from blue to red. The weight of the device also increases by around 120g; proving that moisture has been absorbed. When this happens, the device is plugged in and a small heater drys out the crystals, turning them blue and allowing you to use the dehumidifier again.

This type of humidifier is silent, easy to use and inexpensive. It is also non toxic and 100% renewable.

Because crystal based dehumidifiers are compact,cordless and don’t require batteries, they can be used almost anywhere; whether hung from garage roofs or on a caravan windowsill.

Compressor dehumidifiers

Advanced Slimline Dehumidifier
Practical decor
A powerful motor inside the dehumidifier sucks in moisture from the air. This moisture then sits in a reservoir, and a light lets you know when its full. To aid the drying process, heat is blown out by a fan.

Compressor dehumidifiers are attractive and blend in with most house’s decor, they’re also compact and unobtrusive.

The majority of these devices can regulate the humidity of a room to an exact level. Meaning you regulate the atmosphere to your liking. Simple programmes allow you to manage the speed and duration of the dehumidifier too.

Peltier dehumidifiers

The silent assassin of mould
Otherwise known as thermoelectric dehumidifiers and probably the smartest of the lot. Electrical currents create a cool surface which draws air through the dehumidifier.This allows water vapor to be condensed, and collected in a reservoir.

The risk of malfunction is minimised as moisture is absorbed with no moving parts. The clever thermoelectric technology also means that the device is silent. There are no chemicals used, no expensive refills and they are very easy to use. Simply plug in and go.

These compact dehumidifiers can be easily stored and can be moved from room to room. Like the compressor dehumidifiers, they also feature an in built fan which blows out warm air, speeding up the process.

Dehumidifiers make your environment cleaner and drier. Without the harmful mould and damp of winter, you and your home will be happier. So the question shouldn’t be “should I get a dehumidifier?” but “which one should I get?”

What size log splitter do I need?

For cosiness, nothing beats the warmth of a winter fire. But before you relax, you need to prepare your firewood.

There are several ways to do this, and one of the most popular is with a log splitter. There are hydraulic log splitters, foot operated log splitters and of course, the simple axe/maul. Remember, size matters, but which size is for you?


Maul on wood
A lumberjack’s best friend
Source: The Department of Style
Mauls look like a sledgehammer with the face of an axe which widens quickly. As you drive through the wood, the wider face forces the wood to split.

Axes and mauls are without doubt the simplest way to split logs into manageable pieces. So if you have a small wood pile then a maul may be for you. They are extremely portable, relatively inexpensive and make you feel like a lumberjack.

Those with bad backs might struggle to use a maul, and if you find a knot in a log, then it will be almost impossible to split. Axes and mauls are dangerous tools and injuries can happen. People with children, pets or unsteady hands should exercise caution.

Foot powered log splitter

D3953 Foot Operated Logsplitter Cj
The wood is at your feet
Foot powered log splitters are essentially a jack with a piston that pushes the log onto a splitting wedge. Each pump on the foot lever results in around 1.2 tonnes of force, effortlessly splitting logs.

By using a log splitter, wood can be turned into burnable chunks far quicker than with a maul or axe. Like a maul, a log splitter is easy to transport and store, so it won’t be in the way when not in use. Unlike a maul, a foot operated log splitter is extremely safe.

Because no upper body strength is required, those with bad backs can still enjoy a warming fire. And frugality is assured as it’s foot power rather than electricity that moves the piston.

Splitting green wood? Unseasoned wood is denser and harder to split, so for this task you may need something more powerful than a foot powered log splitter.

Hydraulic log splitter

D3803 Dual Logmaster Logsplitter 2 Cj
Serious log splitting
Up to your neck in logs? Then this is probably the choice for you. Hydraulic log splitters plug into household sockets and pack around 6 tonnes of force.

Without a swinging blade, they are incredibly safe, and labour is minimised because all you need do is load the wood.

Older wood has less moisture content and is easier to split. But with the force of a hydraulic log splitter, even greenwood won’t be a problem. And knots are no match for this sort of power.

How to describe a hydraulic log splitter? Big, powerful and easy to use.

Why buy a halogen oven?

Grills, ovens and hobs are the core appliances in most cook’s kitchens. But have you ever considered the advantages of cooking with a halogen oven?

A halogen oven is smaller, healthier, faster, easier, cheaper and more versatile than traditional cookers. Don’t believe me? Then let me explain.

Space friendly

Halogen Oven
Wine not included
The incredibly compact 12 litre halogen oven is all you need to cook a whole roast dinner. No pots, pans and baking trays required. With a worktop friendly 30cm diameter footprint, it’s the perfect cooker for small flats, caravans and kitchenettes.

Another space saving option is a microwave, which uses radiation to heat up water molecules. But this creates steam, which in turn can make food soggy. Halogen ovens use heat, not waves, and the fan makes sure all parts of the food get cooked. This process makes your food crispier and tastier.


Brocoli Crowns
The healthiest food of all?
Source: Nature’s reward
Halogen ovens are designed to drain away fat when cooking. So you get the same Sunday roast taste, but without the unhealthy fat.

Steaming is a great way to cook healthy, and it’s a method well within the capabilities of a halogen oven. Steaming unlike boiling, retains the food’s nutrients rather than washing them away with the boiling water. Now super healthy greens are just a steamer tray away.


Usain Bolt at Olympics
“No one is near, I can now slow down”
Source: Flickr
Conventional ovens don’t have a hi-tech radiant halogen bulb, but halogen ovens do. Having this bulb, along with an air circulating fan, helps halogen ovens cook up to 40% faster than their conventional counterparts.

Waiting for the conventional oven to preheat is a thing of the past. Halogen ovens heat up in 3 minutes, helping to cut roast dinner cooking times to less than an hour. Conventional ovens cook at a comparative snail’s pace, and need at least 2 hours to cook a good roast.


swiss army knife
Maybe not that versatile
Source: Swiss knife shop
Grill, steam, bake, thaw, roast or toast your food. And don’t be limited by the size of the glass bowl, as a lid extender can give you even more cooking capacity.

At a mere 7kg, a halogen oven can be moved around the kitchen freely, allowing you to clean worktops, or put it away for storage. BBQs can even be enhanced with an on hand halogen oven, to roast potatoes or just keep food warm.

Visible cooking

Conventional ovens don’t make it easy for the chef in question to see how their food is doing. With a halogen oven, flapping doors, steamed up glasses and wasted heat are a thing of the past. The space age light given off by the heating element, combined with the glass bowl, make your food easily visible, and keep glasses steam free.

The sight of your food transforming can also be fun for small children, and big kids alike.

Save money

Pink Piggy Bank On Top Of A Pile Of One Dollar Bills
A halogen oven cooks pork perfectly
Source: Senior Living
Save pennies and pounds from the start as a halogen oven is less expensive than a conventional one, but does exactly the same thing, and more.

Frugal folk will also be pleased to hear of further savings. The reduced heating and cooking times, mean that less energy is used than conventional ovens, grills or hobs.

Extreme needs for thermal trousers

It was Alfred Wainwright who said, “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only unsuitable clothing.”

While this may be true for most situations, there are places where the weather is so severe that no matter what you wear, the elements are bound to come out on top.

Pack your sandals, shorts, thermal trousers and perhaps even a windproof umbrella – as we embark on an extreme weather tour of the world.


It’s cold up north
Source: Sometimes Interesting
Slip your feet into ice skates, or strap on your snowshoes – you’ll need them in the coldest inhabited place on earth. The isolated Russian village of Oymyakon has a population of just 472 – not surprising given its shiver inducing, monthly mean temperature of -46°C.

It’s not just the villagers of Oymyakon, who have it tough. Inhabitants of the Canadian research facility ‘Eureka’ spend the whole year dressed in thermal trousers and super warm coats. With the world’s lowest annual mean temperature of -19.7°C, stepping outside in your jeans and sweater can be fatal.

For a more accessible chilly city, try Winnipeg. The Manitoban capital is dubbed “Winter-peg”, as temperatures rarely reach double figures even in the summer. Once in 1879 the thermometer fell to a bone chilling -47.8°C!


Dallol, Ethiopia
Not your usual tourist trap
Source: Atlas Obscura
Many of us like to escape the gloom of the British winter. So if you like to wear your shorts and t-shirt in winter, how about a holiday to Dallol in Ethiopia? The town is a little short on tourist facilities, but it’s consistently sunny. Between 1960 and 1966, the mean daily temperature was 41.1°C, making it on average, the hottest town on earth.

Even the most dedicated sun worshiper would think twice about rolling out their towel in Death Valley. The record temperature there is 56.7°C, which in a place where people run marathons and visit for tourism, is really something.

Unlike Dallol and Death valley, no one has ever lived in the Lut desert of Iran. This is hardly surprising given the temperature there has reached 71°C – the highest ever recorded.


Wellington wind
It’s windy down south
Source: Expat Forum
Chicago is called the “windy city” but it’s nothing compared to Wellington. The New Zealand capital once recorded a wind speed of 248km/h. Certainly not weather for a sun hat.

Wellington is built on the edge of the Cook Strait. There, a gap in the mountain range running the length of the North and South islands creates a wind funnel that accelerates the air blowing through it. The effect is strongest on the Wellington side, making this one of the most windy cities on earth.

Wellingtonians must be very fond of windy weather – the shape of the capital’s Westpac Stadium, aka the Cake Tin, creates a vortex – was that by accident or design? So if you go and watch the All Blacks play, you may wish to take a windproof umbrella.


Bathing in the rain
Bathing in the rain
Source: Asfayara
Here in Britain we get out and about despite the rain – donning our waxed jackets and rubber wellingtons to fend off precipitation. But in some places, you may just want to stay inside.

Separated by just 10 miles, inhabitants of the Indian towns of Cherrapunj and Mawsnyram must fight over the title for wettest place on earth. In June and July you can expect 120 inches of rain there, more than double the UK annual average of 45 inches.


San Pedro de Atacama
Not a hose in sight
Source: Leave Your Daily Hell
Jump into moon boots and visit the Mars coloured sand of San Pedro de Atacama. Chile’s Atacama desert is the driest place on earth, but that doesn’t stop flip-flop wearing backpackers from visiting.

Due to the minuscule 15 mm of annual rainfall, there’s a 3 minute shower limit. So you have to wash your hair quickly, or everyone goes thirsty.

If you do decide to visit the Chilean desert, don’t forget to pack something warm to wear. Daytime temperatures maybe scorching, but at night, the mercury can fall to -10°C.


Singapore Humidity
A muggy night over Singapore
Source: I Super Love
Find yourself a time machine and head back to 1922 Libya. If the statistics recorded at the time are correct, the temperature soared to a scorching 57°C with 100% humidity. Dehumidifiers would do you no good here.

Can’t get your hands on a time machine but still want to get hot and sweaty? With an average annual humidity of 84.2%, you could try Singapore. In Singapore’s popular tourist spots and streets you’re sure to swelter, but if you feel a bit faint, there’s many air-conditioned shops and restaurants in which to retreat.

Do you know of any more extreme weather locations we might have missed?

Famous potatoes that escaped the peeler

You fry them, mash them, boil them and bake them, but what about the ones that escaped the potato peeler?

Well some became celebrities. And here is our list of the most famous potato inspired characters of all time.

Mr Potato Head

Mr Potato head with box
The Godfather of Potatoes
Source: Talking Points
D.O.B: 01/05/1952

Type: King Edward Potato

Bio: Since the 1950s, this witty no-nonsense spud has been pulling more shapes than a disco dancing packet of crisps. His role in the Toy Story trilogy turned him into a Hollywood star, but this hasn’t changed him. He still loves Mrs Potato Head and is prone to throwing body parts when annoyed.

Mrs Potato Head

Mrs Potato head on black background
Mr Potato Head’s better half
Source: Puzzle-Games
D.O.B: She won’t tell anyone

Type: Sweet Potato

Bio: Whether she is keeping her husband in check or looking for her lost eye, she has the same short temper as Mr Potato Head. Not quite as old as her hubby, she is perhaps the most well known female potato in the world. And like her husband, has Toy Story to thank for her Hollywood fame.


Spud from Trainspotting
He looks like a naughty Spud
Source: Ford on Film
D.O.B: Unknown

Type: Beer Battered Chip

Bio: Spud is one of those lovable idiots. With a thick Scottish accent and a rather odd interview technique, this tattie spends his Edinburgh days wasting his life away. Often seen with pals, Renton, Begbie and Sick Boy when not being detained at her majesty’s pleasure.

Mr Chips

Mr Chips from Catchphrase
Say what you see…
Source: Digital Spy
D.O.B: 1986

Type: Unknown

Bio: The talented and instantly recognisable mime potato/robot of classic TV show, Catchphrase. He may have been the sidekick to Roy Walker (and more recently Stephen Mulhern), but Mr. Chips always steals the show with his animated antics. Remember “Say what you see, if you see it, say it!”

Bodger and Badger

Type: N/A

Bio: Not actually a spud, but they make the list for their infamous, and slightly unhealthy love of mash potato. Badger, was a notorious troublemaker, often seen hurling balls of mash at his human co-stars, much to the joy of children of the 90s who see them as cult heroes.

Can you think of famous potatoes or spud based characters we may have neglected?